Midwest Current Transformer has been an industry leader in design and production of current transformer products for over 50 years. Our focus is to build quality products designed to meet your needs. You may choose from any of our standard products or we can design and build a custom solution specifically for your application..

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It is the goal of Midwest Current Transformer to maintain its position as a worldwide industry leader . . .

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CT Series Current Transformer

CT Series Current Transformer

The CT Series offers a wide range of standard ratios to 1 amp and 5 amp secondary outputs.

Standard units are manufactured with 24 inch leads, 600 volt fiberglass insulation wrap and a protective polyurethane coating.

Screw terminals, high voltage insulation, mounting brackets and ratios to 0.1 amp are available. Please specify when placing your order.

RC Series Current Transformer

RC Series Current Transformer

The RC Series offers a wide range of standard ratios to 1 amp and 5 amp secondary outputs.

Standard units are manufactured with 24 inch leads and a round polycarbonate case.

Mounting brackets and ratios to 0.1 amp are available. Please specify when placing your order.

SC Series Current Transformer

SC Series Current Transformer

The SC Series offers a wide range of standard ratios to 1 amp and 5 amp secondary outputs.

Standard units are manufactured with brass screw terminals and a square polycarbonate case.

Lead wires instead of screw terminals and ratios to 0.1 amp are available. Please specify when placing your order.

Custom Current Transformer

Custom Current Transformer

Midwest Current Transformer offers you a wide range of current transformers. Should a standard unit not meet your specific application, our experienced staff will design a custom current transformer for you.

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Premier Current Transformer Manufacturing Company

As a premier leader among current transformer suppliers, Midwest Current Transformer has served customers requiring high quality current transformer products for more than five decades. Our targeted focus is the manufacture of standard and custom design current transformer solutions to meet the requirements of a wide range of applications.

Customized Current Transformer Design

We offer pre-made current transformers to serve the needs of various power applications. Our team is able to customize your order in order to help you achieve the optimum current transformer solution in terms of size, ratio, accuracy, multiple taps, contacts, mounting options, and burden rating. Our range of transformers includes: instrument current transformer, multi ratio current transformer, toroidal current transformer, donut type current transformer, current metering transformer and more.

Our Electrical Current Transformer Construction

At Midwest Current Transformer, we manufacture the majority of our current transformers from cold-rolled grain oriented electrical steel (CRGO). The CRGO steel comprising our current transformers is rolled into your required inner and outer diameter dimensions which permits precise dimensioning and tight construction between layers. As an iron-silicon alloy, CRGO electrical steel provides high permeability and low core loss that enables greater efficiency and cost-effectiveness of the current transformer.

Total Quality Management

Our approach consists of Total Quality Management protocol in which our employees, customers, and suppliers are valued as an integral part of our successful process. Our standard for success is error-free performance with the commitment to error prevention and getting-the-job-done-right-the-first-time mindset.

Through hands-on product inspection as part of an entire quality management system, we strive for perfection at every stage of the manufacturing process before your products leave our hands. We push toward continual quality improvement, adherence to safety standards, and personnel development through high-value training across all levels of our operations.

Contact Us

For more information about the superior current transformer products we offer at Midwest Current Transformer, call us today at 800.893.4047 or email sales@aenpi.com.

Professional Engineering & Investigation Services

Anderson Engineering & Investigations are professional engineers experienced in manufacturing engineering, product and process failure mode analysis, electrical, mechanical, and forensic engineering including fire investigation services.

When you need answers you can trust, Anderson Engineering & Investigations will provide you with timely, understandable results.

Can There Ever Be Too Many Holiday Lights?

Blaze Fire Investigation is now know as Anderson Engineering. (updated 6/28/17)

It is that time of year again where many people have decorated for the Holidays!  Twinkling lights are shining on rooftops, trees and all over the lawns of our friends and neighbors.  Most people know that one person that makes it their mission to have the most beautiful and colorful yard in the neighborhood. If you don’t, you have probably seen the movie National Lampoon’s Christmas Vacation staring Chevy Chase!  What lots of people don’t think about is how much power all of their lights consume and how much is too much for the extension cord, outlet or electronic device that they have the lights plugged into.

Every electrical device has a voltage and maximum power rating. The amount of power it takes to light a string of holiday lights varies depending on the type of light and the number of lights in that particular string. For example, a typical 300 light string can consume 72 Watts of power.   How many Watts of power are your lights, holiday decorations and devices rated for?

Our investigators at Blaze Fire Investigation and Anderson Engineering were involved in an origin and cause investigation of a holiday light device that synchronized the twinkling of the lights with holiday music. This particular device had a maximum power rating of approximately 400 Watts. Burn patterns pointed directly at this device as being a possible cause for this fire.

Our team of origin and cause experts and engineers examined the evidence, performed testing on exemplar products and were able to determine that the origin of the fire was internal to this holiday lighting device.  Testing results showed the over wattage of the device could cause a component inside the device to fail in an unsafe manner and ignite the flammable plastic housing of the device without tripping any circuit breakers in the house or blowing any fuses in the device or holiday lights themselves. 

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Why Greg Terlecky Works at Blaze Fire Investigation

Blaze Fire Investigation is now know as Anderson Engineering. (updated 6/28/17)

Greg Terlecky’s path to fire investigation started out with firefighting. Although it wasn’t a career that he had originally envisioned for himself, when a friend talked him into taking the entry exam and giving it a try, he found that the work suited him very much. This is also what happened when he moved into investigative work with the Office of Fire Investigation (OFI) for the City of Chicago at the suggestion of a colleague. Now as an investigator for Blaze Fire, Greg is able to apply his knowledge and experience to accomplish the kind of forensic work that has moved his career to the next level.

Strong Culture of Cooperation

Just as he was introduced to firefighting by a friend, it was a colleague who introduced him to Blaze Fire Investigation. What drew Greg to Blaze was the strong culture of cooperation and the resources that the company has readily available because of the relationship with Anderson Engineering of New Prague. Greg knows that he can call on Forensic Electrical Engineers to validate his interpretation of evidence or to provide guidance when the case is particularly complex. Having strong administrative support is also a great asset to Greg when he’s in the field, allowing him to focus on what he does best.

Expertise and Team Work

Greg holds the C.F.E.I. and C.F.I. credential and is in the process of attaining certification for Marine Investigation. Continuing education and training is an integral part of the fire investigation profession, and Greg has found that Blaze Fire Investigation not only encourages but supports his goals to further his career with training and education. Greg appreciates the way that his individual career path is important to Blaze Fire Investigation owners, Erik Anderson and Beth Anderson, and he recognizes that their investment in him is a reflection of their overriding philosophy of using team work and expertise to get the best results for their clients.

“It’s very clear that everyone at Blaze and Anderson Engineering are there to help each other and pool resources,” says Greg. “There is a definite feeling of cooperation here and that translates into a better product for the client.”

Fire Sprinklers Save Lives In Your Home

Blaze Fire Investigation is now know as Anderson Engineering. (updated 6/28/17)

Saving Lives, Not Just Property

Smoke detectors have been alerting people to fire danger in their homes since the 1960s and now residential fire sprinklers are saving even more lives. With 8 out of 10 fire related deaths being the result of home fires, it makes sense to invest in both detection and extinguishing equipment in your home to reduce the risk of death in a fire by 82%. The development and use of fire sprinklers began back in the 1800s to protect warehouses and factories where property was stored in large quantities. It took many large fire tragedies in hotels and multi-family residences to direct attention to the need for fire sprinklers to save lives and not just property. Now many states are contemplating the adoption of building codes that require home sprinkler systems in newly constructed homes, led by the state of California with a law that became effective in 2011.

How Home Fire Sprinkler Systems Work

You have probably noticed sprinklers in commercial buildings because they are sometimes unsightly but home fire sprinklers can look as unobtrusive as a small circular panel on the ceiling. Unlike smoke detectors, the sprinklers are activated by heat and not smoke. When activated, the sprinklers only switch on where the heat is detected, not through the whole house. Because of their quick response time, a home fire can be extinguished in minutes, often before the fire department even has the chance to arrive at the scene. They also use less water because the fire is still small and damage to the structure and its contents is limited to the immediate area of the fire.

How to Get Home Fire Sprinklers

The easiest installation of a home fire sprinkler system is when a new home is being constructed but it is also possible to retrofit older homes. The system will be designed to cover most areas of your home and operates off of your water main. One sprinkler can cover an area of 12’ by 12’ and small non-livable areas such as bathrooms and closets are not included. Plastic pipe is installed behind walls and ceilings and attach to the individual sprinklers. Ask your contractor about adding this life saving feature that will also increase the resale value of your home in the future.

Protect Your Family and Your Home

Once installed, fire sprinkler systems need minimal maintenance. They also can be considered environmentally friendly because they use less water than firefighting, and they minimize the transfer of toxins from burnt materials to waste water. The most important reason to get a home fire sprinkler system is to protect your family from injury or death. No one expects a fire to happen, but if it does, investing in fire sprinklers at home can mean the difference between a bright future or none at all.

Why Liz Works at Blaze Fire Investigation

Blaze Fire Investigations is now known as Anderson Engineering. (updated: 6/28/2017)

When you call the Blaze Fire Investigation office, Liz Rockwell will probably be the person who you talk to first. On the Blaze team for more than three years, Liz provides the administrative wheels that move client cases from in-take to final report. Administration and operations intertwine in Liz’s day. She may be dispatching investigators, finalizing reports, scheduling appointments, or managing the office bookkeeping. Her many skills and attention to detail allow her to provide clients with the best customer service while enabling the investigators to focus on what they do best.

Working at Blaze Fire Investigation provides Liz with many things other than a paycheck. She finds the industry to be very stimulating. “You never know what situation is next.” she says. While her position holds a great deal of responsibility, the owners grant her the autonomy and tools to get the job done in the manner that she feels is most efficient. Her opinions are heard and valued. As the mother of a young son, Liz appreciates the flexibility that the company gives her to adjust when the need arises.

The Chicago office where Liz works operates as a hub for the Blaze and Anderson Engineering teams that are spread out through several states. The company has worked hard to develop a culture that supports and enables all employees to serve clients with a team approach. While Liz is the administrative wheels, she knows she's not driving by herself.

Fire Investigation in Boat Storage Areas

Blaze Fire Investigation is now know as Anderson Engineering. (updated 6/28/17)

As the boating season comes to an end, it is time for owners to have their pleasure and sporting craft stored for the winter months. Many people prefer indoor storage because it fully protects their boats from the weather, but they also like to work on their boats when they can’t be out on the water. When fire investigators are called to a scene in a boat storage area, they may find that something a boat owner did during their tinkering caused a fire that not only damaged their own boat, but those around it.

Fire Hazards in Boat Storage Area

The hazards inherent in a boat storage area are defined by a legal code but the guidelines in the code are either not known or ignored. For example, boats are supposed to be stored with gas tanks 75% or more full. This limits the vapor space that allows for expansion and contraction of the gases. A recent survey conducted by Blaze Fire Investigation revealed that most people leave their gas tanks less than 10% full. It seems counterintuitive, but this creates a hazard because there is a larger vapor space and vapors don’t stay put, they migrate. All it takes is an open flame like a cigarette or a torch, or the use of an electrical tool and you have an ignition source that can cause an explosion.

Flammable Fumes and Faulty Electrical Work

In addition to fuel vapors, boat owners use a variety of flammable liquids to clean and refinish the surfaces on their boats. Power tools can provide an ignition source by causing sparks. Excessively long extension cords that are wound over, under and around the other vessels parked in the building can also be a potential ignition source. The guidelines in NFPA 303 regarding electrical systems in wet locations are complex and unless an owner is also a professional electrical, they probably won’t be able to understand and follow them. Still, owners work on the wiring and electrical components of their boats, creating hazards when they use non-marine aftermarket parts and incorrect wiring techniques.

Investigating Large Losses in Boat Storage Facilities

When Blaze Fire Investigators get a case that involves a boat storage area, it often represents a large loss. Boats are stored in close proximity during the off-season which makes it easy for a fire to spread to neighboring vessels in a very short amount of time. Fire Investigators’ knowledge of the environment in boat storage facilities helps them to move through all aspects of the case. They expertly manage the scene and assure that everyone who needs to be on call for the investigation is included.

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Why Dave Semrow Works at Blaze Fire Investigation

Blaze Fire Investigation is now know as Anderson Engineering. (updated 6/28/17)

At the age of seventeen, Dave Semrow began his training to become a fire fighter.  At the age of eighteen as senior year of high school, and with the fire house across the street from school, Dave responded to fire calls from class.  When a run came in, he jumped to it whether he was at lunch or in the middle of Trigonometry class.  Upon graduation from high school, Dave obtained his certification and began his career in firefighting that would span more than 30 years and include everything from being on the firefighting front line, to haz mat, to heavy equipment operation to fire investigation.

Most of Dave’s career was with the City of Milwaukee which is where he also first became a fire investigator. With fire investigation, Dave enjoyed the way he could take years of experience as a fire fighter and apply this knowledge to fire investigation.  He found the work to be extremely interesting, challenging and he enjoyed the investigation process that required analytical and problem solving skills.

Not quite ready for retirement

When it was time for retirement in 2012, he wasn’t quite ready to just disappear from the fire service brotherhood.  He had spent a lot of time and effort acquiring the training and certifications to be a fire investigator, and wanted to keep working so he started to look for the right opportunity. As Dave contemplated where he might be able to keep working as a fire investigator, he steered away from the big national companies.  He did a few investigations with Terry Sheppard of Blaze Fire Investigation and recognized a good fit.

Company Structure Sets Investigators Up for Success

At Blaze, Dave immediately saw how the structure of the company sets the investigators up for success. The owners, Erik Anderson and Beth Anderson, are great to work for. He has always felt comfortable going to them for suggestions or input. Having consistent engineering resources at his fingertips is an incredible resource that is unique to Blaze Fire Investigation. Administrative support  from Liz Rockwell  and access to high quality lab analysis resources helps Dave to focus on fire investigation giving the clients excellent service.

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Knowledge of Boat and Dock Systems Vital to Fire Investigation

Blaze Fire Investigation is now know as Anderson Engineering. (updated 6/28/17)

Marine fire investigators need to understand boat and dock systems, how they are interrelated and how they function in order to accurately determine origin and cause of a fire incident. The ability to read boat schematics allows investigators to look at the arrangement of bulkheads and electrical systems in their analysis and point to potential causes of failure. The effects of vibration, corrosion and the addition of after-market parts can create fire hazards that the investigator can pinpoint because he knows what should and should not be present in the construction of the vessel.

Most boat fires are caused by electrical issues

Electrical systems on boats run many systems - from pumps and blowers, to heating and air conditioning. Wires run throughout the boat where they can be possible ignition sources. It is possible for a fuel leak to cause a fire in a location that is not close to the source of the leak. Fuel vapors can travel to the place where vibrations may have chaffed the wiring, or corrosion has eaten through the wire coating, creating an ignition source. Boats are designed with ventilation systems to remove dangerous vapors but sometimes these systems fail because of lack of maintenance, or lack of knowledge of the boat owner about their proper use.

Many owners do not themselves, understand the intricate electrical systems on their boats. They unknowingly create fire hazards when repairs have been made that don’t take into account actual power requirements or use marine approved wiring and materials. Improper fueling procedures cause fire hazards when the boat owner doesn’t realize the necessity of blowers to vent the vapors from the boat interior. As with any fire investigation, interviewing the boat or dock owner and any witnesses provides important information that, when combined with forensic analysis, leads to a confident conclusion of origin and cause.

Dock systems may be the cause of boat fires in harbor

A pleasure craft is not just a hobby for many people, it’s their home. Just as a camper plugs in to water and power at a camp ground, a boat does the same at a marina slip. The water and power systems on the dock need to be considered when examining a fire that has occurred while in harbor. A failure in the installation of an electrical supply could result in reverse polarity into a vessel or a ground fault that energizes the surrounding water.

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Why Steve Fabry Works at Blaze Fire Investigation

Blaze Fe Investigation is now know as Anderson Engineering. (updated 6/28/17)

If you can imagine what 10 million gallons of water looks like after it has been sprayed on a fire in 15 below zero temperatures, then you can picture the fire scene where I first encountered Blaze Fire Investigation. The location was West Allis, Wisconsin where I was a police officer and detective. I was called to a fire scene on New Year’s Eve, along with others including representatives from the state fire marshal’s office and the ATF.

The fire scene was a large building that housed a hobby store, so there were many flammable substances contained within its inventory of model-making materials and supplies. Even before beginning the investigation, it was clear to see that there was heavy damage, including collapse of the roof, and it would most probably be a total loss. Add to that all the water that was used to extinguish the fire, and the below zero temperatures. It was a very daunting task to begin to analyze the scene.

Methodical and organized approach to fire investigation

Blaze Fire Investigation arrived representing the insurance company. Right from the start, I saw how they methodically and efficiently handled what needed to be done. They brought in an accelerant-sniffing dog. They set up a warm air fan to blow into the building to melt the ice. On stand-by was an excavation company with heavy equipment just in case it was needed to access the rest of the structure. They even set up a warming shed so that the people involved could better handle the sub-zero temperatures on this bitter cold New Year’s Day.

What impressed me the most about the work that Blaze Fire did during this investigation was their methodical, organized approach that showed that they were not going to take any shortcuts. At the same time, they had the resources and the expertise to arrive at the facts in an efficient manner. Not only did they call on in-house engineers but the investigator on the scene was herself, an electrical engineer, which meant they she was able to do an in-depth analysis in a relatively short period of time.

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Blaze and Bob Donate New American Flag

Blaze Fe Investigation is now know as Anderson Engineering. (updated 6/28/17)

Bob Leonard, founder of Blaze Fire Investigation, along with his wife, Danielle, and the team at Blaze Fire Investigation donated a huge 40'x24' United states flag to the Dousman, Wisconsin Fire Department. The donation celebrates Bob's 45 years of service to the department on the occasion of his retirement. Through the decades, Bob has filled different roles, most recently that of Assistant Chief. The flag will be hung from the department's aerial trucks for special events.

Read more about Bob Leonard's career on the Lake Country Now newspaper.

Marine Fire Investigation Scenes

Blaze Fire Investigation is now known as Anderson Engineering. (updated 6/28/17)

You might think that it’s redundant to talk about the scene of a boat fire, but marine fire investigation includes fire scenes that are above, below and out of the water.

The fire scene – below the water

Because the scene of a boat fire is usually on the water, there are inherent difficulties that are present in the analysis and recovery of the damaged vessel. If the boat has sunk, the investigation needs to begin by documenting the scene with underwater photographs. Depending upon how deep the water is, the spread diameter of debris can be quite extensive. In addition to providing valuable information about what happened to the boat, the photo documentation operates as a check system to assure that all possible artifacts have been recovered. Because of the movement of water, and the potential presence of vegetation and rugged underwater terrain, it isn’t always possible to collect all debris but that is the goal for this part of the marine fire investigation.

The fire scene – above the water

When a scene includes a vessel that is still on the water, investigators need to be cautious with their movements, determining if the boat is safe to enter. In addition, fluids within the various systems will leak into the void spaces in the vessel and migrate into the surrounding water creating an environmental issue. Containment of any spill will be necessary as will notification to the area Environmental Protection Agent or Water Reclamation District.

On or under the water, the next part of the investigation will take place on a hard deck. The process of moving the boat to the hard deck is complex requiring the expertise of marine salvagers. The weight of water from a split or sunk hull adds to the difficulty in bringing it to the surface or moving out of a marine or dock area. This process could further damage the boat as it is pulled from the water causing evidence to be lost. Custody of the boat is determined by the authority of jurisdiction. That authority will make decisions about the recovery process; who has custody of the watercraft; and what measures are necessary to assure security.

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Resistive Heating Origin and Cause Uncovered

Blaze Fire Investigation is now known as Anderson Engineering. (updated 6/28/17)

CASE STUDYSITUATION:

A Blaze Fire Investigator is called to the scene of an apartment fire. The area is nearly knee deep in debris and objects have been moved around, changing the scene. There is a clear fire pattern observed on a wall, pointing to the floor. A sofa is burned on one side and a window air conditioning unit is visibly melted.

OUR INVESTIGATION:

This investigation needed to begin with an interview with the tenant. With his home unlivable because of the fire, he was not easy to find but when located through a relative, he was cooperative. The tenant was able to visually recreate the room and the placement of furniture that had been disturbed during the course of the fire fight. Although one would assume that the air conditioner would not be used on a cool day, the tenant was able to share that because the multi-family building was usually warm, that he did, in fact, leave the air conditioner on while he left to go to an appointment.

Our investigator carefully sifted through the debris and discovered a fire pattern from the window pointing away from the wall. While the window air conditioner exhibited damage on its exterior, it did not appear to have damage that emanated from within the unit. There were badly damaged extension cords and a power strip with numerous inputs on the floor.

In consultation with forensic engineering colleagues at Anderson Engineering of New Prague, our investigator was able to determine that the origin of the fire was one of the extension cords and the cause was resistive heating, or too much power traveling through the cord.

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NFPA 921 Guidelines Instrumental in Aiding Fire Investigation Outcomes

Blaze Fire Investigation is now known as Anderson Engineering. (updated 6/28/17)

In-depth knowledge of the NFPA 921 guide, regarding notification to interested parties in a fire investigation, is critical to establishing a potential path to recovery for our clients. In addition to determining cause of the fire, it is our goal to provide notice to the parties so that those involved are only those that are necessary, and that the fire scene is preserved as much as possible to allow everyone equal opportunity to participate in the investigation. Blaze Fire Investigation is able to expertly incorporate NFPA 921 with a combination of the expert skills of our on-site investigators and the availability of forensic engineering consulting through colleagues at Anderson Engineering of New Prague, Inc.

Determining origin - interviewing

Fire scenes come in all conditions, from very light damage to total destruction. Whatever the scene, our investigators know that the people involved can be quite upset and even traumatized by what has happened. As our investigators make contact with these people as they enter a scene, they reassure them about the purpose of the investigation, and with their forthright and nonthreatening manner, open the door to honest dialogue.

Blaze Fire Investigators use well-honed interviewing skills to ask the right questions that will uncover facts that move the investigation along. The questioning strategy might include reconstructing a visual of the objects in the scene. It could include a history of renovations or repairs that have been made to the property. Questions directed at behaviors and actions that occurred prior to the fire are very important to identifying potential causes of a fire.

Determining origin - forensics

As they sift through debris at a fire scene at the beginning of an investigation, Blaze Fire Investigators balance their goal of determining origin with the need to preserve evidence if a joint scene is required. This is where connections with forensic engineers at Anderson Engineering of New Prague, Inc. provide Blaze Fire with resources that other investigation companies do not have readily available. At any time, our investigators can consult with an electrical or mechanical engineer to better identify products and systems that may be involved.

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Blaze Fire Determined Origin and Cause Without Joint Investigation

Blaze Fire Investigation is now known as Anderson Engineering. (updated 6/28/17)

CASE STUDYSITUATION:

A fire started in the kitchen of a restaurant. Many artifacts were present that could possibly start a fire including food warmers, microwaves, gas oven and stove, the building wiring system, and light fixtures. A fire suppression system was also in place and may or may not have functioned as designed. Calling in representatives for all of these appliances and electrical systems would be costly and may not be necessary. Was it possible to determine the cause of the fire without destruction of artifacts in the event that a joint scene investigation is warranted?

OUR INVESTIGATION:

An electrical engineer from our parent company, Anderson Engineering, was called in to provide additional forensic expertise to examine the debris and artifacts. Working in tandem, the fire investigator and the electrical engineer went through the debris. The Fire Department had examined building components, pieces of wiring and light fixtures as part of their investigation and created a separate artifact pile. In conjunction with a fire suppression expert, the fire investigator and electrical engineer concluded that the fire suppression system did not malfunction. The appliances were examined one by one.

The gas stove had the remains of a gray melted plastic material on it. Through interviews with the restaurant staff, it was determined that at the end of the day, the cook routinely used a plastic bussing bucket to carry soap and water to the griddle for cleaning. The bucket was usually set on the gas stove beside the griddle during cleaning. The pilot light provided a continual source of heat even when the burners were not lit.

The cause of the fire was the plastic bussing bucket that was left on the stove. The water evaporated and the plastic came to combustible temperature and ignited.

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How We Manage a Joint Fire Investigation Scene

Blaze Fire Investigation is now know as Anderson Engineering. (updated 6/28/17)

Fire investigation scene management

Managing a joint fire investigation scene in a methodical, organized manner keeps costs low for our clients. Our management creates efficiencies while getting the job done. Our first step is to determine if a joint investigation is needed. As we begin to examine the scene, we look for origin and cause. We rule out items that show zero evidence of involvement. This assures that we have the correct representation at the joint investigation. When the appropriate parties have been notified, it's our job to manage the scene so that everyone can have access to the information and evidence. This results in decisions that are made accurately and quickly.

Joint scene preparation

When artifact representatives arrive for the joint investigation, we provide them with a packet that contains the fire department incident report, a diagram of the scene, a protocol of how the scene will be excavated and how artifacts will be collected, any lab reports, and a synopsis of events prior, during and after the fire. Taking the time to gather this information efficiently answers questions that routinely arise in the investigation process and assures that everyone has the same baseline knowledge of the scene.

The scene itself is maintained and protected so that it is in the condition that it was when the fire department released the scene. If the fire department made any changes in the course of their own investigation, that is noted. Safety concerns are placarded as well as "Do Not Enter" signage in the area of origin. Barricade tape is placed around the area of origin. Plywood may be placed over door openings to limit access. We work with the restoration contractor to create a safe work place.

During the investigation

The packet that the representatives receive as they arrive on the scene includes a plan for how the investigation will be conducted. It includes steps for digging out debris, collecting artifacts and reconstructing the area of origin. The Blaze Fire investigator managing the scene goes over the plan and responds to any questions or requests from the participants, always mindful that the objective is an unbiased investigation. Shovels, ladders, lights, power equipment and any other tools that might be needed at the scene are ready. If part of a building needs to be removed, heavy machinery will be on hand. Warming equipment to thaw frozen debris and provide a workable air temperature is provided.

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