Midwest Current Transformer has been an industry leader in design and production of current transformer products for over 50 years. Our focus is to build quality products designed to meet your needs. You may choose from any of our standard products or we can design and build a custom solution specifically for your application.

Superior Goals and Higher Expectations

It is the goal of Midwest Current Transformer to maintain its position as a worldwide industry leader . . .

Click here to learn more.

Worldwide Leader

CURRENT TRANSFORMER PRODUCT  SEARCH
FAST RESPONSE TIME CONTACT  US
American Pride Made  in  the  U.S.A.

CT Series Current Transformer

CT Series Current Transformer

The CT Series offers a wide range of standard ratios to 1 amp and 5 amp secondary outputs.

Standard units are manufactured with 24 inch leads, 600 volt fiberglass insulation wrap and a protective polyurethane coating.

Screw terminals, high voltage insulation, mounting brackets and ratios to 0.1 amp are available. Please specify when placing your order.

RC Series Current Transformer

RC Series Current Transformer

The RC Series offers a wide range of standard ratios to 1 amp and 5 amp secondary outputs.

Standard units are manufactured with 24 inch leads and a round polycarbonate case.

Mounting brackets and ratios to 0.1 amp are available. Please specify when placing your order.

SC Series Current Transformer

SC Series Current Transformer

The SC Series offers a wide range of standard ratios to 1 amp and 5 amp secondary outputs.

Standard units are manufactured with brass screw terminals and a square polycarbonate case.

Lead wires instead of screw terminals and ratios to 0.1 amp are available. Please specify when placing your order.

Custom Current Transformer

Custom Current Transformer

Midwest Current Transformer offers you a wide range of current transformers. Should a standard unit not meet your specific application, our experienced staff will design a custom current transformer for you.

Online Catalog

Search Our Catalog

Find existing products for your current transformer needs.

Quote Cart

View items you have added to your quote cart.

Compare Items

Compare items before adding them to your quote cart.

Premier Current Transformer Manufacturing Company

As a premier leader among current transformer suppliers, Midwest Current Transformer has served customers requiring high quality current transformer products for more than five decades. Our targeted focus is the manufacture of standard and custom design current transformer solutions to meet the requirements of a wide range of applications.

Customized Current Transformer Design

We offer pre-made current transformers to serve the needs of various power applications. Our team is able to customize your order in order to help you achieve the optimum current transformer solution in terms of size, ratio, accuracy, multiple taps, contacts, mounting options, and burden rating.

Our Electrical Current Transformer Construction

At Midwest Current Transformer, we manufacture the majority of our current transformers from cold-rolled grain oriented electrical steel (CRGO). The CRGO steel comprising our current transformers is rolled into your required inner and outer diameter dimensions which permits precise dimensioning and tight construction between layers. As an iron-silicon alloy, CRGO electrical steel provides high permeability and low core loss that enables greater efficiency and cost-effectiveness of the current transformer.

Total Quality Management

Our approach consists of Total Quality Management protocol in which our employees, customers, and suppliers are valued as an integral part of our successful process. Our standard for success is error-free performance with the commitment to error prevention and getting-the-job-done-right-the-first-time mindset.

Through hands-on product inspection as part of an entire quality management system, we strive for perfection at every stage of the manufacturing process before your products leave our hands. We push toward continual quality improvement, adherence to safety standards, and personnel development through high-value training across all levels of our operations.

Contact Us

For more information about the superior current transformer products we offer at Midwest Current Transformer, call us today at 800.893.4047 or email sales@aenpi.com.

Professional Engineering & Investigation Services

Anderson Engineering & Investigations are professional engineers experienced in manufacturing engineering, product and process failure mode analysis, electrical, mechanical, and forensic engineering including fire investigation services.

When you need answers you can trust, Anderson Engineering & Investigations will provide you with timely, understandable results.

Fire Investigation in Boat Storage Areas

Blaze Fire Investigation is now know as Anderson Engineering. (updated 6/28/17)

As the boating season comes to an end, it is time for owners to have their pleasure and sporting craft stored for the winter months. Many people prefer indoor storage because it fully protects their boats from the weather, but they also like to work on their boats when they can’t be out on the water. When fire investigators are called to a scene in a boat storage area, they may find that something a boat owner did during their tinkering caused a fire that not only damaged their own boat, but those around it.

Fire Hazards in Boat Storage Area

The hazards inherent in a boat storage area are defined by a legal code but the guidelines in the code are either not known or ignored. For example, boats are supposed to be stored with gas tanks 75% or more full. This limits the vapor space that allows for expansion and contraction of the gases. A recent survey conducted by Blaze Fire Investigation revealed that most people leave their gas tanks less than 10% full. It seems counterintuitive, but this creates a hazard because there is a larger vapor space and vapors don’t stay put, they migrate. All it takes is an open flame like a cigarette or a torch, or the use of an electrical tool and you have an ignition source that can cause an explosion.

Flammable Fumes and Faulty Electrical Work

In addition to fuel vapors, boat owners use a variety of flammable liquids to clean and refinish the surfaces on their boats. Power tools can provide an ignition source by causing sparks. Excessively long extension cords that are wound over, under and around the other vessels parked in the building can also be a potential ignition source. The guidelines in NFPA 303 regarding electrical systems in wet locations are complex and unless an owner is also a professional electrical, they probably won’t be able to understand and follow them. Still, owners work on the wiring and electrical components of their boats, creating hazards when they use non-marine aftermarket parts and incorrect wiring techniques.

Investigating Large Losses in Boat Storage Facilities

When Blaze Fire Investigators get a case that involves a boat storage area, it often represents a large loss. Boats are stored in close proximity during the off-season which makes it easy for a fire to spread to neighboring vessels in a very short amount of time. Fire Investigators’ knowledge of the environment in boat storage facilities helps them to move through all aspects of the case. They expertly manage the scene and assure that everyone who needs to be on call for the investigation is included.

Continue reading
  202 Hits
202 Hits

Knowledge of Boat and Dock Systems Vital to Fire Investigation

Blaze Fire Investigation is now know as Anderson Engineering. (updated 6/28/17)

Marine fire investigators need to understand boat and dock systems, how they are interrelated and how they function in order to accurately determine origin and cause of a fire incident. The ability to read boat schematics allows investigators to look at the arrangement of bulkheads and electrical systems in their analysis and point to potential causes of failure. The effects of vibration, corrosion and the addition of after-market parts can create fire hazards that the investigator can pinpoint because he knows what should and should not be present in the construction of the vessel.

Most boat fires are caused by electrical issues

Electrical systems on boats run many systems - from pumps and blowers, to heating and air conditioning. Wires run throughout the boat where they can be possible ignition sources. It is possible for a fuel leak to cause a fire in a location that is not close to the source of the leak. Fuel vapors can travel to the place where vibrations may have chaffed the wiring, or corrosion has eaten through the wire coating, creating an ignition source. Boats are designed with ventilation systems to remove dangerous vapors but sometimes these systems fail because of lack of maintenance, or lack of knowledge of the boat owner about their proper use.

Many owners do not themselves, understand the intricate electrical systems on their boats. They unknowingly create fire hazards when repairs have been made that don’t take into account actual power requirements or use marine approved wiring and materials. Improper fueling procedures cause fire hazards when the boat owner doesn’t realize the necessity of blowers to vent the vapors from the boat interior. As with any fire investigation, interviewing the boat or dock owner and any witnesses provides important information that, when combined with forensic analysis, leads to a confident conclusion of origin and cause.

Dock systems may be the cause of boat fires in harbor

A pleasure craft is not just a hobby for many people, it’s their home. Just as a camper plugs in to water and power at a camp ground, a boat does the same at a marina slip. The water and power systems on the dock need to be considered when examining a fire that has occurred while in harbor. A failure in the installation of an electrical supply could result in reverse polarity into a vessel or a ground fault that energizes the surrounding water.

Continue reading
  183 Hits
183 Hits

Marine Fire Investigation Scenes

Blaze Fire Investigation is now known as Anderson Engineering. (updated 6/28/17)

You might think that it’s redundant to talk about the scene of a boat fire, but marine fire investigation includes fire scenes that are above, below and out of the water.

The fire scene – below the water

Because the scene of a boat fire is usually on the water, there are inherent difficulties that are present in the analysis and recovery of the damaged vessel. If the boat has sunk, the investigation needs to begin by documenting the scene with underwater photographs. Depending upon how deep the water is, the spread diameter of debris can be quite extensive. In addition to providing valuable information about what happened to the boat, the photo documentation operates as a check system to assure that all possible artifacts have been recovered. Because of the movement of water, and the potential presence of vegetation and rugged underwater terrain, it isn’t always possible to collect all debris but that is the goal for this part of the marine fire investigation.

The fire scene – above the water

When a scene includes a vessel that is still on the water, investigators need to be cautious with their movements, determining if the boat is safe to enter. In addition, fluids within the various systems will leak into the void spaces in the vessel and migrate into the surrounding water creating an environmental issue. Containment of any spill will be necessary as will notification to the area Environmental Protection Agent or Water Reclamation District.

On or under the water, the next part of the investigation will take place on a hard deck. The process of moving the boat to the hard deck is complex requiring the expertise of marine salvagers. The weight of water from a split or sunk hull adds to the difficulty in bringing it to the surface or moving out of a marine or dock area. This process could further damage the boat as it is pulled from the water causing evidence to be lost. Custody of the boat is determined by the authority of jurisdiction. That authority will make decisions about the recovery process; who has custody of the watercraft; and what measures are necessary to assure security.

Continue reading
  176 Hits
176 Hits